For some reformatory is the best place

In Dehradun, the ebullient BJP president let lose his tongue, when he taunted the Congress over the delay in hanging of Afzal Guru, BJP President Nitin Gadkari asked the party whether the Parliament attack death row convict was its ‘son-in-law’.

ON 12th May 2010 at Chandigarh, Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) president Nitin Gadkari said that Samajwadi Party chief Mulayam Singh Yadav and Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD) leader Lalu Prasad were like “dogs who lick the feet of the Congress” but later took back his words saying he didn’t mean to be offensive.

Gadkari accused Mulayam Singh and Lalu Prasad of betraying the opposition on the recent cut motions in parliament and said: “Bade daharte the sher jaise, aur kutte ke jaise ban kar Sonia-ji aur Congress ke ghar par talve chatne lage’ (these leaders were roaring like lions but later bowed like dogs to lick the feet of Sonia and the Congress).”

In Dehradun, the ebullient BJP president let lose his tongue, when he taunted the Congress over the delay in hanging of Afzal Guru, BJP President Nitin Gadkari asked the party whether the Parliament attack death row convict was its “son-in-law”.

In comments that could stoke a controversy, Gadkari thundered at a BJP rally in Dehra Dun last night asking Congress leaders “Is Afzal Guru the son-in-law of Congress? Have you(Congress) given your daughter to him(Afzal). Why is he being given special treatment?”

Congress reacted with disdain to Gadkari’s remarks saying he has lost his mind and scoffed at the BJP chief. When asked by reporters whether he would apologise for his controversial remarks, Gadkari said he stuck to his stand.

“I have said nothing wrong. I stick to my stand and so there is no need (to apologise),” Gadkari told reporters in Dehra Dun.
It is clear that bad habits and bad society leave their mark even if you reach the moon. Now and again they crept up and unmask the reality of character and mindset. Often old Adam raises his head and people unlearn spontaneously.

Traditional, cultural and moral values that we learn from our elders and that had been the mainstay of our civilization seem to be losing their grip over society and politics. Our leaders are usually devoid of knowledge of protocols and decency. Civilized humor is something foreign to them. That reminds me of the sophisticated humor prevalent in civilized people. Samuel Butler had said sarcastically about Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Carlyle: “It was good for God to let Carlyle and Mrs. Carlyle to marry one another and so make only two people miserable instead of four.”

Here is another example of vivacious humor in black, a letter to Duke of Grafton (1789) by some Junius:

“It is not that you do wrong by design, but that you should never do right by mistake. You may look back with pleasure to an illustrious pedigree in which heraldry has not left a single good quality upon record to insult or upbraid you….”

And the one I like the most by Sidney Smith addressing Lord John Russell:

“When I am in pulpit, I have the pleasure of seeing my audience nod approbation while they sleep.”

Or

“You and I are exceptions to the laws of nature; you have risen by your gravity, and I have sunk by my levity.”

There is something for the people like Gadkari to learn. Other wise, as someone has said, “You ought not to go into society if you don’t know how to accommodate yourself.”

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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