Tears and Whistles – Life is not ‘Roses Roses all the way……’

“Kuch be-wafaiyan bhee zarrori hain Ishque men,
Varna Khuda Gavah hai main be-wafa naheen.”

One of my superiors had just returned from court after he finalized the court formalities of the divorce process. On the other side of the break-up was a beautiful lady who had rebelled against her parents and married this smart man. Both had been closer to me all through the pink stream sail and the river of fire. Being a fiduciary subordinate, as a principle, I had never played gooseberry between them. Their last day of togetherness was another story. He called me in his cozy cubicle.

‘Get me some drink. I’m fancy-free now….’
‘Relax Sir……’ I got him a demitasse of Turkish Coffee from the Company Cafeteria and decided to keep silent until he broke the ice.
He took a long to finish his bitter coffee.

‘What next Sir……..?’
‘It is already 2.30 now, Book two tickets for REGAL. They are playing ‘Posidon’s Adventure, ’ and come with me.’

It was a great movie and after the show, he dropped me at my PG accommodation at Bandra. We both were silent all the way.

‘I’ll pick you at 9 and we will dine at ‘Khyber.’ Come prepared with something better to talk about.’

I was never a psychologist or a psychiatrist albeit a writer known for sensitive essays.

Both had to say a lot of things, to give an excuse for the break-up, and most of them were not real. The real excuse was FIDELITY and their previous relationships. In the storm of lover’s passion they never discussed it.

At home, I opened the window overlooking the Band Stand, took the only chair I had, and sat straight. In the intervening space of time, I tried to put myself in his place and anticipated what I would love to hear at that critical juncture.

I knew it was a Challenging task to say the right words to someone going through hards times. However, everyone knows that divorce is a welcome end to a marriage that isn’t working. But for some, it can be the most devastating experience they’ll ever go through. The break-ups cause immense grief reactions in form of fear, insecurity, confusion, and pain. Divorce destroys the hopes and dreams of a beautiful life; it is an end of a fascinating world.

But you can’t rewrite the past; you can’t change it. You’ve to move forward and not backward.

I knew that lady when she was a girl. She has had several admirable traits apart from her cascading auburn hair, aquiline nose, well-defined lips, and mesmerizing hazel eyes. She was the product of St. Angnus Christ Church College and fluent in English dialogue. In my wildest dream, I’d never thought that a day will come when the beautiful couple would change the tracks.
Last but not least, I knew we would meet again and I can’t pass an irresponsible remark just to soften the rough contours of my superior. This lady had always been kind to me.

We arrived Kala Ghoda. Once inside the eatery, he asked me to place the order as the steward of Khyber was waiting for that.
My superior was not that tense but still under strain.
So, I began with – “I know Sir, it’s hard on you now, but you won’t always feel this way. In a few weeks, you will hopefully start to feel better. Believe me, I’m sorry that things ended for you two at an unforeseen strange turn. Do you want to talk about it?”

“No….”

“Fine, that means you had already overcome the most excruciating knoll in the road. Let’s eat and talk like old times. Recall when things were simpler in life. You had a scooter and Bombay was not as crowded and noisy as it’s now. You liked the ‘Vithal’s Bel Poori,’ “Sarwi’s Kebabs’ and ‘GhasitaRam’s Qulfi?’ You would often ask me to come to Cricket Stadium by sea.
He smiled.

There were long breaks of silences and closing of eyes. I was patiently and curiously watching the changing hues of his face, his body language, and the smoke circles that he was billowing.
At last, we finished the dinner leaving a lot in plates and bowls.

I told him I was also tired and needed some rest.
“Sir, in the end, everything’s going to be okay. there’s always a silver lining to every dark cloud. A break-up often opens the door for something new or better to come along.

I don’t know if he was in a better state of mind but he was closing his eyes quite often.

Normally, he would drive the car himself. That day was an exception when he had asked me to drive home.

It was the end of a story; it was an opening of a new chapter. It is life.

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Tears and Whistles – Science and Technology – boon or bane?

We know that that progress comes with a cost. And the first casualty of progress is the relationship, basic values of sacrifice, and interdependence. With a geyser in the bathroom, an old father doesn’t need a young son to carry on the bucket of hot water for him and show the filial feeling of help; with a microwave oven in the kitchen the grandma can warm the food herself and the daughter-in-law could freely go to her parent’s home without leaving behind a need-based vacuum; with an automatic washing machine at house laundrette, the old couple can keep themselves clean, out of a bandbox, without the frowns of ungrateful children.

However, that progress would stretch cruelty to that extent was beyond my imagination until I read the following report in the newspaper today:

There is disturbing news from Saharanpur. In Fatehpur Dhola village of Thana Gangoh area here, a 16-year-old boy cut his elder brother with a shovel for not getting a mobile. Not only this, the body was cut into pieces and buried in the house itself. After 22 days, when the strong smell started coming, the villagers informed the police. After the search, the boy’s pole was exposed. The incident is being told three days before Eid. Farman of Fatehpur Dhola village had bought a new mobile three days before Eid i.e. on 18th July. Farman’s age was 30 years. The same night his younger brother Rahman, 16, also asked for mobile for himself. When not found, a fight started between the two. Meanwhile, Rahman shoveled Farman into the head. The shovel was very sharp. Farman died on the spot. Frightened, Rahman dismembered Farman’s body with a shovel and then buried a pit in a room in the house itself. For 22 days he roamed freely in the village. When the villagers asked, they said that the elder brother has gone to work. On Monday night, when a strong foul smell started rising, the villagers called the police, and then the secret of the murder was revealed.

Everyone was stunned as soon as the police opened the door of Rahman’s house. There was a strong odor coming from the room. People started vomiting. When the police interrogated the accused Rehman, he confessed to the murder of his brother. Later, at the behest of the accused, the police got the excavation done. The body was rotten. The police arrested the accused and sent the body for post-mortem.

There are three sisters and two brothers in the family. The parents have already died. While all three sisters are married. The deceased Farman and accused Rehman lived in the house. Farman used to work as a laborer to feed his younger brother.
Just until 20 years back, we, the middle-class gentry were comfortably living without mobiles. Mobile phones were considered a big luxury. Now they are a necessity.
Technology is an integral part of our everyday life. Today’s technology becomes outdated tomorrow. And the technological inventions have ensured maximum satisfaction of the demanding market. These achievements deserve accolades and reflect the capabilities of civilization.

But the cost is too heavy – a loss of human touch.

We deal most of the time with total strangers whom we would never meet in life. How often do we socially interact with our near and dear ones? Family interactions are slowly but surely becoming extinct. Video-conferencing is the order of the day.
Thanks, Covid – 19, we have a genuine excuse to back up for all our derelictions of distances.

The inventions and innovations would always be a boon if do not allow ourselves to be reduced to their slavery. Someone had said that these developments are welcome but there are two sides to every coin. Roads of Science and technology may be broader but there may the potholes also somewhere. Traffic may be smooth but accidents are inevitable.

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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And the time ran out……

Glimpses of the time that’s gone….Karvan guzar gaya ghoobar dekhtey rahey..

If my memory is not at fault, it was most probably in 1970 -71 during the AMU Student’s Union Tehreek for the preservation of ‘Aqleeyati wa Iqamati Kirdar’ (minority character) of Aligarh Muslim University that I came closer to the top Muslim leadership of India, individually and as a group. The time-lapse of almost 50 years has obfuscated a lot but I can vividly recall that three days gathering was organized at the grounds of ‘Mehendiyan Graveyard’ and Ranjit Hotel (an ITDC venture) near Asif Ali Road, New Delhi.

The student leader late Javed Habeeb Saheb had suggested to Janab Ahsan Rizwi sahib of ‘Radiance’ to include my name in the reception group that was supposed to take care of the personal needs like telephone, telex, transport, press access, and instant tea/coffee needs of the top leadership of Ummah. Some of those leaders were already staying at their state guest houses, top hotels, and Jamaat’s accommodation at Old Delhi. Janab Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah sahib, Ebraheem Suleman Seth sahib, Justice Basheer Ahmad Sayeed sahib, Justice Kalbe Abbas Sahib, Dr. Fareedy sahib, Salahuddin Owaisi sahib, and Yusuf Siddiqui sahib are the few names that were etched on my memory screen. Most of those leaders are departed to heaven and their children are now leading the Muslim Ummah in India.

It was a three days long session. We used to have ‘Darbar Khas’ at the auditorium of Ranjit Hotel where only guests were allowed and ‘Darbar Aam’ was held at the grounds of the graveyard.

One day a group of prominent leaders of the Sikh community and other minorities came to meet Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah Saheb. As a member of the hospitality team, I was lucky to hear their discussions. They were all telling Sheikh Saheb that he was the tallest leader among all the leaders of minority committees of India with inimitable clout. They were inviting him to come out of his comfort zone of Kashmir and lead all minorities of India. They insisted that he was the right person at the right place and at the right time to help the Indian minorities in all walks of life. They were assuring him of their full support. Even an immature mind like mine was shocked when Sheikh Sahib politely refused to entertain their appeal. His excuse was – there was a lot of work left to be done in Kashmir. He was preoccupied. With all the sophistication at his command, Sheikh Saheb did let the offer go.

I’m thankful to God that Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah sahib is no more to see what had happened to his Kashmir………………….Naim

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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The Uncertainty of Moon Sighting

Chanda Mama Door key
Wait for another day……

It’s is 9th of August 2021 and I’ve just returned from the mosque at 9 pm.

They say that no moon sight was confirmed from Lucknow, Hyderabad, or Mumbai. So the new year of Islamic Calander has to wait for another day and the mourners of Imam Hussain (AS) Martyrdom have to look for the next day for ‘Ayyam-e-Aza’ – the days of collective sorrow.

The Dawoodi Bohra Community follows a definite calendar which they call Misri or Egyptian tradition. It was produced by one of their High Priest (Dai-e-Mutlaq) more than fifty years ago. There is no confusion of days or dates of celebrations and observances in this Community. They were also confused about Arabic dates before that.

In my community, a learned scholar and sage late Moulana Kalbe Sadique Saheb had advised us to follow the Science of Astronomy and make decisions. His voice was also proved a cry in the wilderness. No one in the powerful religious hierarchy of my faith gives currency to his words.

I’m not entitled to speak about Sunni School of Thought.
It is ironic and pathetic that while others are exploring the other planets of the galaxy as they have already established their presence at Moon, why are we the Muslims still waiting for clouds to clear and see the thinnest slice of Moon to begin the New Year?
We were not always like that.

We were the followers of the same Prophet (PBUH); we had carried the light of learning through so many centuries; we were the same Muslims who had inspired Europe’s Renaissance and Enlightenment; we were the mathematicians who had developed the order of algebra. They were my forefathers who had invented the magnetic compass and tools of navigation; we were the masters of pen and printing, and we had discovered how disease spreads and how it can be healed.
Historian Bernard Lewis has noted in his book “What Went Wrong?”, that “for many centuries the world of Islam was in the forefront of human civilization and achievement.”

Read the history of human progress and you will find that Algebra, Algorithms, Alchemy, Alcohol, Alkali, Nadir, Zenith, Coffee, and Lemon were the words all derived from Arabic, reflecting Islam’s contribution to the West.

Today, the spirit of science in the Muslim world is dead almost, nowhere to detect. Muslim countries have nine scientists, engineers, and technicians per thousand people, compared with a world average of forty-one. In these nations, there are approximately 1,800 universities, but only 312 of those universities have scholars who have published journal articles. Of the fifty most-published of these universities, twenty-six are in Turkey, nine are in Iran, three each are in Malaysia and Egypt, Pakistan has two, and Uganda, the U.A.E., Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Kuwait, Jordan, and Azerbaijan each have one.

There are roughly 1.6 billion Muslims in the world, but only two from Muslim countries have won Nobel Prizes in science (one for physics in 1979, the other for chemistry in 1999). Forty-six Muslim countries combined contribute just 1 percent of the world’s scientific literature; Spain and India each contribute more of the world’s scientific literature than those countries taken together.
What went wrong?

What happened to our scientific heritage of Medina, Damascus, Baghdad, Cairo, or Córdoba?

According to dispassionate and unbiased scholars, Muslims’ decline as an intellectual and political force was gradual and pronounced. There are excuses that “Arabic science” was not the same science as we are familiar with it today. Pre-modern science, while not blind to utility, sought knowledge primarily to understand philosophical questions concerned with meaning, being, the good, and so on.

Modern science, by contrast, grew out of a revolution in thought that reoriented politics around individual comfort through the mastery of nature. Modern science dismisses ancient metaphysical questions as (to borrow Francis Bacon’s words) the pursuit of pleasure and vanity. Whatever modern science owes to Arabic science, the intellectual activity of the medieval Islamic world was not of the same kind as the European scientific revolution, which came after a radical break from ancient natural philosophy.
Ironically, what my priests usually talk about in their sermons is hardly relevant to the challenges to the modern world. They discuss the topics and tell the stories that may sound inspiring for the success in the Hereafter, and they have nothing to offer to solve the complex problems we’re facing today.

We’re blessed with a plethora of pious sage. We celebrate their Happy Birthdays; we observe the mourning periods of their Death and Death anniversaries. The rest of the time we argue about the Right of Succession of Imam Ali(AS). For 2 months our youth are competing for the recitations of elegies.

Thirty days of Ramzan are for the purification of the soul and consumption of the finest foods.
Where is the time left for serious academic studies?

Most of the Muslim scientists of the last centuries were inspired by the House of Holy Prophet (PBUH) but none of them had ever participated in religious polemics or bothered to jump into the Theological Fights that are so important and time-consuming for us now.

It’s a very sad and pathetic state of affairs. I pray Almighty God to guide us and extricate us from the torpor.

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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From Yezid to Godse – a train of tyrants

For an ordinary student of the Evolution of Islam, the events that occurred in the life of the Prophet of Islam (PBUH), and after his death, had been described and interpreted by scholars, so-called scholars, and charlatans in a way that puzzles and confuses. The next issue is the belief in the infallibility of the Prophethood where none can dare to question the motives and modus operand of the steps taken by him or at his behest or in his name except for the good.
As a historical figure, one can either be famous or infamous. Scholars of Shia Islam and Sunni Islam both have had made genuine efforts to analyze his life and achievements. In this article, this scribe would take up only the period that followed in the decades soon after the Prophet (PBUH) left this world.

I shall not take up the issue of the legitimacy of KHILAFAT or successions as there are contradictory claims all backed by very powerful arguments on both sides about Imam Ali’s (AS) right to be his Immediate Khalifa. It has never been settled, and this dispute would carry on until the Day of Judgment.

But after Khilafat-e-Rashedah, how Amir Muwaiyah bin Abu Sufiyan usurped the powers of the Head of the Ummah, by hook and crook, and transformed the “Khilafat’ into “Mulukiyat” is a subject that had been discussed in every century. And in the last century, great scholars like Moulana Abu Lal Moudoodi, Dr. Taha Hussain have expressed their views very clearly.

The earlier scholars like Ibne Khateer, just to name, had written volumes about it. I will quote an observation here:

“In 50 AH / 670 AD, Al-Hasan ibn Ali, the most fortunate in the line of succession died. This allowed Amir Mu’awiya to circumvent the terms of the peace treaty he had already agreed to. After listening to advice from some of his followers and supporters he appointed his son Yazid as his heir and sent word to the Muslim settlements to receive their oath of allegiance (bay’ah).

Ibn Katheer al-Dimashqi explains Mu’awiya’s move in his book “The Beginning and the End” by saying: “He believed him to have worldly brilliance, the knowledge of warfare of the sons of kings, and thought that no other man is better to be the Caliph”.
Despite the opposition of a group of companions of the prophet such as Hussein bin Ali and Abdullah bin Zubair, but they were forced to remain silent after they were threatened with death, according to the “History of the Prophets and Kings” of Ibn Jarir al-Tabari.

In 60 AH / 679 AD, with the death of Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, these differences erupted, and appeared on the political scene, after Yazid demanded that his opponents pledge allegiance to him. Al Hussein and Ibn al-Zubayr refused and left Madina heading for Mecca away from the powerful grip of the Umayyads.”
End of the Quote

It is also authentically narrated in the historical references that in his last days, Amir Muawiya had warned Yazid that he should be careful about how he would handle four persons; Imam Husayn (a.s.), Abdullah bin Umar, Abdullah ibn az-Zubair, and Muhammad ibn Abu Bakr, who opposed his succession. When Mu’awiya died in Syria, his son Yazid staked his claim as the successor of the head of the Islamic State. Yazid appointed his kin and his henchmen as Governors of various provinces. He appointed his cousin al-Waleed bin Utbah bin Abu Sufyan as the Governor of Medina. Al-Waleed himself showed respect to Imam Husayn (AS) and didn’t cause any harm to Imam. At the meeting, al-Waleed read out the first part of the letter demanding Imam Husayn’s allegiance, and then he gave the letter to Imam Husayn (AS) to read the later part which contained the command to kill him.
Marwan accosted the Imam and said, “I advise you to swear allegiance to Yazid and reap the benefits.”

And here is what the history recorded the response of The Imam (a.s.):

“It is because of us God opened up creation. It is due to us that creatures get their sustenance, and it is due to us that life continues. The likes of me do not pay allegiance to the likes of him (Yazid). You want me to swear allegiance to Yazid who is an infidel and immoral person. No wonder it is you who is supporting Yazid, for it is you, Marwan, whom the Prophet (S) had banished for sedition and mischief.” Imam Husain refused to surrender to the threats nor was he trapped by flattery.

Imam Hussain (a.s.) was faced with two options; he had either to capitulate to the demands of Yazid or to leave Medina to prevent bloodshed. He left Medina in the morning, two days before the new moon of the month of Sha’ban in the year sixty of Hijra. Imam Hussain (AS) followed the highway from Medina to Mecca,
From this narrative, I shall leapfrog to the Message of Imam Hussain (as) for the sake of brevity and to keep the focus on the main issue –“Tyrants, Bigots, and Killers”

It is important if we take into consideration what were those principles that Imam Hussain (as) had stood for.

There were issues of Character of Yazid bin Muawiyah apart from the major issues of the legitimacy of his succession. Yazid was Muslim but name only; he was ostensibly pretending to be a Muslim for political gains, and just to stay in power. He had openly derided the Holy Prophet (PBUH) and Islam. He was a debauch and a drunkard of vile nature. Yazid, by descent or by himself, never possessed any noble qualities. His grandfather had plotted and carried out several strategic plots to kill the Prophet in the earlier period of Islam. His grandmother was Hinda who had chewed the martyr Hazrat Hamza’s liver. His mother was Maysoon, a Christian planted by the Christians to avenge the defeat conceded by them when they were confronted by the Prophet (PBUH) at the event of Mubahala.

The famous Historian Nicholson wrote, “The slaughter of Husayn does not complete the tale of Yazid’s enormities. Medina, the Prophet’s city, having expelled its Umayyad governor, was sacked by the Syrian army, while Mecca itself, where Abdullah bin az-Zubayr had set up as rival Caliph was besieged, and the Kaaba laid in ruins’.

The pertinent point is personality and character of Yazid was never in dispute among Muslims.

The message of Imam Hussain (AS) is:

“Fighting unto death for truth is more honorable and valuable than submitting to the wrong way.”

From the beginning until his end, Imam Hussain (AS.) had staunchly opposed the debauch and tyrant Yazid. He preferred to sacrifice himself and his near and dear fellows rather than to surrender before him. The tragedy of Karbala taught humanity a lesson. The story of Karbala is the most painful tragedy, humanity has ever faced. Yet, the remarkable (though appalling) events in Karbala appeared like a great revolution that shook the foundation of Islamic culture. The battle of Karbala was a battle between humanity and oppression that Karbala turned into a triumph. The tragic event became the guide, that always reminds Muslims to practice Islam honestly and sincerely, to do what is right as a Divine obligation irrespective of consequences, and fear no one except Allah.

Muslims believe that the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) was an embodiment of universal mercy and Muslims are the greatest beneficiaries of this universal mercy.

From Imam Hussain (AS) to Yazid, from Gandhi and Godse, the characters arguably fall into either camp as they had a role to play and they played to the hilt. But they will certainly be remembered more for the roles they played and the legacies they have left behind.

The famous Islamic scholar Allama al-Barazanji in his book ‘Al-Isha’ah’ and Ibn Hajar in as-Sawa’iq record that when Imam Ahmed ibn Hanbal’s son asked his father about cursing Yazid, he replied, “How can Yazid not be cursed when God himself has cursed him.”
At page 254 of Preface to History (Muqaddimat at-Tareekh) is mentioned, ‘the fact that the Islamic scholars are united in admitting the irreligiousness of Yazid and they hold that such a person can not be an Islamic ruler and that any action taken against him can not be construed as impermissible.

In recent times, some writers inspired by Saudi Wahabi Doctrines, have attempted to support Yazid on the ground that Yazid was not personally involved in the slaying of Imam Hussain (AS) or responsible for the subsequent events that took place. They hold that Ibn Ziyad and Ibn Sa’d were solely responsible for the horrible deeds…They even consider Yazid as the Commander of the Faithful [Ameerul Mo’minin]. They have conspired to legitimize Yazid’s oppressive and tyrannous rule to downplay Imam Husain’s sacrifice and martyrdom by declaring Imam Husain (AS) to be a militant against the established rule.

Likewise, Nahuram Vinayak Godse is gaining popularity in some quarters these days.

He was a nationalist BIGOT who assassinated Father of the Nation on January 30, 1948, when he visited the then Birla House in New Delhi for a prayer meeting. Godse had fired three bullets at Gandhi’s chest from a close range, ensuring his demise. Godse chose not to escape, was arrested, tried, and sentenced to death. He was born into a Konkani Brahmin family from Baramati, Pune. He was inspired by nationalist ideals and chose to join the Hindu Mahasabha and the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh or RSS.

Godse joined as a ground-level worker of RSS who later had become the editor of a Marathi daily called Agrani – Hindu Rashtra. Godse argued that he was unhappy about Gandhi’s support for the Muslim community and blamed him for the partition of India and the formation of Pakistan. As for killing Gandhi, Godse said he felt, “Indian politics in the absence of Gandhiji would surely be proved practical, able to retaliate, and would be powerful with armed forces. No doubt, my own future would be totally ruined, but the nation would be saved from the inroads of Pakistan.”
His hanging took place on November 15, 1949.

Thomas Jefferson is reported to have said: “I have investigated and prosecuted dictators and their henchmen for most of my professional life. I have studied their lives, personalities, their rise to power, and how they governed once achieving that power. The one common theme in their theories of governance is fear. It is easier to govern and dictate to citizens through fear.”

“Never surrender before a tyrant” is what the martyrdoms of Great Men of history like Imam Hussain and Gandhi Ji inspire us. In the twenty-first century, mankind is pushing back and trying hard to hold dictators, tyrants, and thugs accountable. With the advent of modern international criminal law, mankind created international courts and tribunals, which include a permanent International Criminal Court, to seek justice for victims of those who rule by fear.

I feel enough literature is available in all languages around the world about Mahatama Gandhi and his contribution to uplift Humanity, and this article is more about Imam Hussain (AS). I shall conclude it with what Gandhi Ji had said about Imam Hussain (AS):

“If I had 72 companions like Husain, I would have freed India in 24 hours, from British. The progress of Islam does not depend on the use of the sword, but on the supreme sacrifice of Imam Hussein, I learned from Hussein, how to achieve victory whilst being oppressed.”

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Tears and Whistles (The Relationship between Father and Daughter)

Whistle on a blackboard

“No one in this world can love a girl more than her father.” –Michael Ratnadeepak

According to modern psychology, daughters learn what kind of man they should bond and form relationships with from their fathers. And it is never one-way traffic. Fathers also learn how to be gentle, patient, and loving from their daughters.
If we look into the history of Islam, we find that there is no greater father-daughter relationship than that of the Prophet (PBUH) and Hazrat Fatimah (SA)

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Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Tears and Whistles (Britney Spears and the twists in Life)

A super-achiever and her bouts with insanity:

She is a pop icon who has sold over 100 million records worldwide, including over 70 million solely in the United States, making her one of the world’s best-selling music artists. She was ranked by ‘Billboard’ as the eighth-biggest artist of the 2000s decade. According to ‘Forbes’ reports, Britney Spears was the highest-paid female musician of 2002 and 2012.
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Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Tears and Whistles

Intelligence and Immunity

“You can’t be old and wise if you were never young and crazy.”― Chris Brown.

I am well aware of the fact that I don’t have any remarkable IQ but that doesn’t push me into an abyss of IC (No Intensive Care but Inferiority Complex}. Everybody is not born to an Einstein or Newton. I’m comfortable with the limited intellectual portfolio my God had gifted me.
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Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Tears and Whistles (An intended Weekly Column)

Think of last week and you will find that the favors of God always exceeded the trials and tribulations you had to face in the same period. Maybe God’s favors are often beyond the normal comprehension but they are there. You are never forsaken by God. Every pain has a reward like every night has a day.
But you can’t escape the sorrow and pathos which are the realities of life. Continue reading

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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COVID – 19 has some positive impact also.

“Tragedy should be utilized as a source of strength.’ No matter what sort of difficulties, how painful experience is, if we lose our hope, that’s our real disaster.” – Dalai Lama Continue reading

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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