Home they brought their Jaswant Singh

Home they brought their Jaswant Singh

Home they brought their Jaswant Singh

A statement issued by the Gujarat government had said that Jaswant Singh’s book questions the role of Sardar Patel during the partition of India as well as his patriotic spirit and charged him for trying to defame Patel by distorting facts.

IT IS the story of Jaswant Singh. His book titled “Jinnah, India, Independence and Partition” was released on August 17, 2009 and banned in Gujarat with immediate effect a Bharatiya Janata Party-ruled state. He was given a cold shoulder and finally shown the door in the initial storm of political hara-kiri.

Let us not discuss here about the very open arms that this party always held out to Salman Rushdie and Taslima Nasreen in the name of freedom of speech. A statement issued by the Gujarat government had said that Jaswant Singh’s book questions the role of Sardar Patel during the partition of India as well as his patriotic spirit and charged him for trying to defame Patel by distorting historical facts.

In his intuitive moments of sincerity and honesty the ex-army men and ex-foreign minister of India Jaswant Singh has emphatically blamed Jawaharlal Nehru, Sardar Patel and the Congress rather than Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah for partition of India. Ihe paid his tributes to Jinnah in the following words “ the epic journey of Jinnah from being the ambassador of Hindu-Muslim unity, the liberal constitutionalist and Indian nationalist to the Quaid-e-Azam of Pakistan”. Jaswant Singh set no inhibitions in declaring in an interview with Karan Thapar on television channel.

“I was attracted by his (Jinnah’s) personality, which has resulted in a book. If I was not drawn to his personality, I would not have written the book… He [not only] fought the British for an independent India but also fought resolutely and relentlessly for the interest of the Muslims of India”. When Thapar asked, “Was Jinnah was a great man ?“ He replied, “Oh yes, self made man who resolutely worked towards achieving what he had set for himself.”

And here are his more than million billion $ comments on the plight of the Indian Muslims today: “Look into the eyes of the Muslims that live in India and if you truly see through the pain in which they live in to [the] land which they belong; we treat them as aliens”.

Pearls of wisdom from the honest man“…He (Jinnah) created something out of nothing and single-handedly stood against the might of the Congress and the British who didn’t really like him…Gandhi himself called Jinnah a great Indian. Why don’t we recognise that? Why don’t we see (and try to understand) why he called him that?…I admire certain aspects of his personality; his determination and the will to rise. He was a self-made man.

Mahatma Gandhi was the son of a Diwan. All these (people) – Nehru and others – were born to wealth and position. Jinnah created for himself a position. He carved in Bombay a position for himself. He was so poor that he had to walk to work…He told one of his biographers that there was always room at the top but no lift…and he never sought a lift”.

According to Jaswant Singh : Indian leaders had not only misunderstood Jinnah but made a demon out of him. According to him the demonisation of Jinnah was a direct result of the trauma of partition.

So Mr. Bhagwat and Mr. Gadkari, let us know if Jaswant Singh has disown any of his statements ? If your answer is Yes, please show us.

If your answer is a singular No, God bless you in whatever form you worship.

You are making compromise after compromise. You accepted Advani Ji’s double speak in many on many of faux pas and blunders. The saving grace in Advani Ji’s case is that he did put many Alzheimer kind of excuses in his comments on Kandhar and made a 180 degree turn on Jinnah when caught in the wrong box.

Jaswant Singh is made up of a different mettle. Jaswant Singh has come a long way from the deserts of Rajasthan.

He had also been rough two wars whilst in service (1962 and 1965) before joining politics. He has served seven terms in Parliament, and, in the BJP-led governments of 1996 and 1998-2004, held charge of six ministries of the Government of India, including External Affairs, Defence and Finance. He is as an authority on Indian foreign policy and national Due credit should be accorded to him for dexterously steering India out of the turbulent diplomatic times in the aftermath of the nuclear tests.

Today he is returning on his own terms – only to show you that your party is devoid of any ideology. You need power at the expense of every principle you trumpeted since the birth and rebirth of you communal out-fit.

I welcome the honorable comeback of Jaswant Singh. It augurs well for Indian Democracy. Good-bye the divisive philosophy of Golwalker, Hedgware and Shyama !

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Debate – The ornament of a parliament

parliament

parliament

Last week the Lok Sabha witnessed a rare event in our democracy. An intelligent, dignified debate. It gives heart to the country to see its leaders indulge in healthy argument instead of wasteful walkouts. May this be the start of a new trend?

WHEN WAS the last time we saw, or our ebullient members of Parliament allowed us to witness their arduous intelligent debates about any one problem plaguing the millions of this country? My memory is as good or as bad as any of our readers’.

Of course it was last week! Those were the best of the moments of Indian Parliament. The leader of opposition Lal Krishna Advani and P.M. Manmohan Singh were debating at their best and the country and world realized what a healthy democracy India is. It was in sharp contrast to the pointless opposition walkouts.

Disruptions and adjournments are no way to advance discussions on any serious issues. This debate should be a lesson for the neophyte politicians and green horn parliamentarians. It proved that Lok Sabha is still more than capable of serving its intended purpose – a venue for the discussion of pressing issues, where the executive are held accountable.

The Lok Sabha on Wednesday witnessed an interesting and intriguing dialogue when Prime Minister Manmohan Singh intervened repeatedly and rejected senior Bharatiya Janata Party leader L K Advani’s charge that United States’ pressure was behind India’s decision to talk to Pakistan. Advani suggested that the US was behind the recent Indo-Pak foreign secretary-level meet as President Obama had publicly said during his Presidential campaign that he would try to resolve the Kashmir issue.

This, the BJP leader contended, marked a change in the US position as the previous US administrations had maintained that they would not mediate in Indo-Pak relations unless both the countries wanted it.

In a sharp verbal duel during the debate Singh asserted that there has been no change in the US policy on Indo-Pak relations since US President Barack Obama came to power. He intervened on more than two occasions during the 75-minute speech by Advani, seeking to set the record straight on the Indo-Pak talks besides other issues like ‘one-rank-one-pension’ for armed forces.

“You are using this debate to sow seeds of rift between the government and the armed services,” Singh said.

”What you are attributing to President Obama is certainly not true. In my discussions with President Obama, he has unambiguously said that there is no change in the US policy towards India and Pakistan (relations),” the Prime Minister asserted.

Advani claimed that India and Pakistan had held “secret” talks over Kashmir and wanted the government to tell the Parliament what the parleys are about. P.M. countered him with the details of the series of parleys held between the former External Affairs Minister Jaswant Singh and US Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott not being shared with the Parliament when BJP was in power.

“Let me ask you one question. How many times did Jaswant Singh hold talks with Strobe Talbott. Was Parliament kept informed about the over dozen meetings? Why then are you expecting me to answer hypothetical questions,” Dr. Singh said.

At this, Advani appeared to be defensive and said he had read about these “secret” meetings in the media. “If there is no substance, I will be happy,” he said. He, however, said the government should be cautious “even if there is an iota of truth”. Advani also questioned the utility of the recent talks with Pakistan, which he suggested marked a shift in India’s post 26/11 stand of not holding dialogue with Pakistan till it ended terrorism. He suggested that the government appeared to lack unanimity in approach over talks with Pakistan.

Noted economist and Noble laureate Dr Amartya Sen had raised some fundamental issues confronting democracy in his book ‘The Argumentative Indian’. Politics and current state of affairs have always been amongst the favorite topics for a vast majority of Indians. These debates do not play any significant role in national affairs but they illustrate that political awareness is the essential ingredient of democracy and has always been inherent in the Indian psyche.

The opposition must understand that ‘Dharnas’ & ‘walk-outs’ serve no purpose except that the precious Parliament time is lost. It leads to rallies and violence once it spills out on the roads. Our worthy leaders must realize that it is always better to stay and debate – even condemn and criticize – than to walk out and that too often en masse.

Naim Naqvi

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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