Those who do great things are usually silent!

The history of Hindi poetry is extended over a period of almost one thousand years. Hindi verse literature as a whole can be divided into four yugas (kal or stages) – Adi Kal, Bhagti Kal, Ritee Kal and Adhunik Kal.

Adikal or Veergatha Kal (the Early Period) The Literature of this period belongs between 10th to 14th centuries. The poetry either highlights certain religious ideologies or praises the heroic deeds of the Rajput rulers and warriors in the form of verse-narrative (Kavya Rass). 

In the Veer Gatha Kal, our popular culture was saturated with themes of conflict, combat, and conquest. In the popular write-ups or folk traditions our heroes in that era were warriors. Even in Adhunik Kal, as a society, we like our celebrities to be cheeky, self-important, and even a bit narcissistic. Fortunately, our beloved prime minister Shri Naredra Modi is blessed to the brim with all these virtues.

As a chief minister of Gujarat he used to address directly to President of Pakistan as Miyan Musharraf. While many thought he was hitting above that weight, there were many who admired his delivery. It is another matter that he landed in Pakistan to celebrate some happy occasion with the family of then prime minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharief uninvited. It was a master stroke of courtesy and politics if you want to agree,

The young new prime minister of Pakistan was not unmindful of NaMo’s gesture to his predecessor. Imran Khan had recently remarked that BJP is the Party that is better placed to do business with Pakistan. He didn’t name Shri Narndra Modi Ji but it was all between the lines to read as everyone knows who wears the breaches in Indian power politics today.

However, the latest statement of Prime Minister Modi is clear indication that NaMo didn’t relish the compliments from across the border at least in this elections season.

Our prime minister announced with all conviction that India is no more afraid of nuclear threats from Pakistan. “Otherwise, Pakistan used to give nuclear threats. What do we have? Have we kept it for Diwali (Warna aay din nuclear button hai, ye kehte the. Hamare paas kya hai. Ye Diwali ke liye rakha hai kya)?” Mr. Modi said. He said Indian forces killed terrorists across the border without engaging in a war. “This is called a strong government. We have created fear among terrorist.” Modi made these remarks at an election rally in Barmer in Rajasthan on Sunday.

These kind of statements are not taken in positive spirit in comity of modern nations. I don’t recall if US President Truman had ever used such kind of expression before he bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki to dust and smithereens. The whole world knows that Pakistan is no match to India might is any equation of power and strength. We don’t need to remind Pakistan, a state that is crumbling under its own contradictions of failing economy, Martial Law and puppet politicians.

Mr. Modi said his government crushed the ego of Pakistan and “forced the neighbouring country to roam in world with begging bowl”.

One can always admire the combination of confidence and bravado but let us not forget that humility is among the most powerful trait of a leader. Humility of a powerful leader can’t be interpreted as a weakness or inadequacy, The humility of a real leader is always lauded as freedom from arrogance and pride. It is this absence of ego and inflated pride that imparts the weight in his words before deeds and actions.

The loud silence of our ex-prime minister Sardar Manmohan Singh was a wonderful example of that virtue.

For the intelligent masses, healthy confidence of their leader flows from genuine competence and self-worth or self-assurance. It can spring from a passionate point of view about finding a better way and being a tireless pioneer in finding that way.

On the contrary, the unhealthy confidence flows from a position of being pampered as expert/guru with the leadership-zapping trait of arrogance. The arrogant expert typically conveys sentiments like, “I said that; I did that” and “I am more than you.”

Reacting to the statement made by Shri Modi, the leaders of the Congress and regional parties in Jammu and Kashmir hit out at Narendra Modi calling it “boastful” and “irresponsible”. Senior Congress leader Anand Sharma and Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh criticised Modi’s remark as “irresponsible”.

“PM Narendra Modi’s election speeches and irresponsible statements point to the growing desperation in the BJP. Prime Minister’s boastful claims of being ready for a nuclear missile attack on Pakistan and US intervention are uncalled for and not in interest of national security,” Sharma tweeted.

Sharma’s reaction was also in reference to Modi’s comments in Patan in Gujarat that after Indian Air Force pilot Abhinandan Varthaman was held by Pakistan, a senior American official on the second day said that “Modi has kept 12 missiles ready and might attack and the situation will deteriorate”. “Pakistan announced return of the pilot or else it was going to be a ‘qatal ki raat'(a night of bloodshed),” the prime minister had said. 

Sharma also said the Congress would like to remind Modi that these elections are about unemployment, farm distress and the betrayal of the voters on electoral promises.

Every Indian is proud of the valour of our forces and our nuclear capabilities, but the government cannot hide behind this, he said, adding, “India needs answers.”

Reminding Prime Minister Narendra Modi that ‘Rashtrapita’ is Mahatma Gandhi and India is celebrated as the world’s largest democracy. It will be a sad moment that India is globally judged & you are equated with Kim Jong-un for making threatening statements of nuclear strike,” Sharma added.

PDP president Mehbooba Mufti hit out at Modi for bringing nuclear bombs in the political discourse, saying if India has not kept the nuclear bomb for Diwali, Pakistan has not kept it for Eid.

National Conference leader Omar Abdullah, also a former chief minister, said threat of nuclear annihilation was not a ‘PUBG’ game where one can hit the reset button to restore normal life.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Our Prime Minister Modi wins ‘Seoul Peace Prize 2018’

Our beloved Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi Ji received the prestigious Seoul Peace Prize for 2018 in recognition of his efforts in promoting global peace and harmony through inclusive economic growth and improving quality of life. The award was presented to PM Modi by the Seoul Peace Prize Foundation at a grand ceremony. A short film on the life and achievements of Modi Ji was also screened at the event. “The Seoul Peace Prize is dedicated to the people of India & our country’s culture of peace and harmony,” PM Modi said after taking the award.

The Seoul Peace Prize was established in 1990 to commemorate the success of the 24th Olympic Games held in Seoul, Korea, an event in which 160 nations from across the world took part, creating harmony and friendship. The significance of the Seoul Olympic Games rests in the fact that the games heralded the termination of age-old political and ideological conflict between the East and the West, fostering a worldwide atmosphere of peace and reconciliation. It also served as an occasion to confirm the possibility of achieving world peace through mutual understanding and cooperation.

The internal committee that decide the winner includes over 1,300 nominators, including internationally renowned Korean and foreign figures in political, economic, social, cultural, athletic, academic and other fields. The nominators should send back the forms after filling in the name of their candidates and their achievements three months before the advised date for the award giving ceremony. The final recipient is selected through a vote by members of the committee.

Here are the details of some of the winners of Seoul Peace Prize:

In 2014, it was given to Angela Merkel of Germany in recognition of her outstanding contribution to protecting human rights, promoting peace, and preventing war and terrorism through international cooperation

In 2010, it was given to José Antonio Abreu for saving juveniles from violence and crime and contributing to building a peaceful society by promoting harmony, cooperation and fellowship through the organization of orchestras. José Antonio Abreu Anselmi was a Venezuelan orchestra conductor, pianist, economist, educator, activist, and politician. He was also honoured with the 2009 Latin Grammy Trustees Award, an honour given to people who have contributed to music by the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences.

In 2008, it was given to Abdus Sattar Eidhi of Pakistan for serving the humanity.

In 2006, it was given to Mohammed Yunus of Bangla Desh for being the foremost leader in the global fight to combat poverty.

It is a great achievement of Shri Narendra Modi Ji and we the Indians are proud of his achievements.

Other awards received by Shri Narendra Modi include:
King Abdul Azis Sash Award (Saudi Arabia 2016)
Amir Amanullah Khan Award (Afghanistan 2016)
Palestine Grand Collar Award (Palestine 2018)
Champion of Earth 2018 Award (UNO 2018)

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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When someone you value ignores you!

An old acquaintance shared a photograph of a senior NRI associate / relative / friend’s family that used to call umpteen times while they were in the foreign land. However, they did totally ignore my existence this time since they landed in the motherland recently.

Being associated with the creative fields of journalism and fine arts, I ‘m used to brickbats and accolades of my readers. It is not easy to accept to go into oblivion.

It happens that people come close, closer, still closer and when their illusions shatter they drift away. With years of swim and trim, the ambience and temp of water affect me no more. However, a human can be apathetic but not senseless. The relationships pass through various stages. Human nature is complex and our behaviour doesn’t always reflect what we’re or we want to be.

It could be very difficult at times to tell what makes the people act the way they do. Why the sudden changes creep into their  behaviour without a clearly identifiable cause. This is especially hard when it comes from your once affectionate associates. The pertinent question remains – `Why is someone ignoring you and why the change? Does this question sound familiar? Are you also often puzzled by this kind of distant behaviour?
Before exploring the reasons, I put some interesting observations based on introspection:

When we’re dynamic, we lose balance; when we’re still we turn stagnant; when we’re intense, we’re tense and when we’re relax, we go lax. So, before searching the holes in others, we should first always look inwards. But blaming oneself is not a healthy option always.

Again the pertinent question needs to be tackled: “Why someone is ignoring you?”

First spontaneous reaction as Mirza Ghalib had said, “Dil ke bahlaney ko Ghalib yeh khyal achcha hai?” (A thought more to palliate your wounded ego).

Before we immediately imagine the worst possible scenario – your associate does think that you’re no longer worth to be in the inner circle, here are some of the most common reasons for someone giving the cold shoulder:

He / she needs to breathe. Too much of your existence has lately occupied their mental spaces.

Upset and doesn’t want to talk about it.
You, yourself might been acting different lately.
Some old or new friends are affecting their decisions.
They are just busy.
They are jealous of your status.

They are thinking of ending things
They have got cold feet or lost the loving feeling – Sometimes, when some guys start to become emotionally attached they just sort of freak out for a bit and get cold feet. They try to push you away, they hesitate and question their own feelings.

Then all one can do is to give some space and time to himself / herself to accept the new reality.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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1o % Reservation for Economically Backwards – a Catch 22

So, finally the BJP has played its trump card! The announcement of 10 per cent reservation for economically backward groups in the upper castes is a masterstroke that has caught every political party off its guard.

These outfits seem to lose their bearing. They don’t know whether they should oppose it of fall in line. To a serious observer of the country’s realities, it is another leap into the dark. There are hardly new jobs and they are ready to dispense something that scantily exists.

In reality it is confession by the regime that it’s a failure at every front. Indian economy has not generated enough jobs in the last almost five years. The government has done nothing on the education front to create a system that could help the youth enter into the economic stream.

We know that the public sector jobs are scarce and private sector is almost stagnant owing to questionable economic blunders made by this government like demonetization, GST etc. Indian economy is no longer as buoyant as it was the need of the hour. We are now back to distributing crumbs.

From Mandal saga to today’s reservation for Swarnas, it is all appeasement – one form or another. Today every other group that can bring the crowd on the road and tilt the balance of vote for one party or another is ready to don the mantle of victimhood.

The original idea of reservation has been stretched beyond combating discrimination and empowering the truly marginalised. Reservation was never an anti-poverty measure in word and spirit. Reservation is too weak an engine to pull the train out of poverty. You can’t address the problem of economic deprivation through reservation. It is preposterous.

Before the general election, as the new regional parties are uniting against the NDA / BJP, it’s as measure to thwart the opposition unity. This is the true backdrop of this act. But both the timing and content of this announcement reflect BJP’s desperation.

Like all previous reservation measures or tactics it is not going to do any good to the society in its entirety. Apart from its acceptance, there will be other constitutional questions to be qualified.

Will a breaching of the 50 per cent ceiling, or the inclusion of groups that are economically behind is going to deepen the crisis of the judiciary? If it caves in, it will be seen as pliant; if it overturns its own previous settlement, it has to set a new precedent. If it does go against the euphoria, the clamour will be to portray the Indian judiciary as an obstacle to greater social justice. Catch 22!

The least we can say –  the government is taking a bet that all conventional legal precedent can go for toss and it can get its way. That is new reality of Indian politics.

It will be fascinating to see if any political party has the guts to speak the truth.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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A former Member of National Assembly of Pakistan Raza Ali Abidi has been gunned down in Pakistan

A former Member of National Assembly of Pakistan Raza Ali Abidi has been gunned down outside his residence in Khayaban-i-Ghazi neighbourhood of the Defense Housing Authority, Karachi, Pakistan on Tuesday.

I’d no idea who Raza Ali Abidi of Pakistan was till I saw the news of his brutal murder. The police official said firing took place after the gate of Ali Raza Abidi’ house had been opened. After launching investigation, police have acquired CCTV footage of the attack. The footage showed two men riding a motorcycle chasing Abidi and one of them spraying the bullets.

The footage run by TV channels showed that a man who was riding pillion getting off the two-wheeler and running away after targeting. Raza was associated with the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) – a political outfit of Indian migrants in Pakistan. He had earlier contested election from Karachi against Prime Minister Imran Khan in the July 2018 general election.

As expected Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan expressed profound grief over the murder of the former lawmaker and expressed condolence to the bereaved family.  ANP leader Bushra Gohar termed Mr Abidi’s death “a huge loss” and said that he “was one of the sanest politicians in Pakistan”.

“Shocked!!! Gone too soon…#RazaAliAbidi was one of the sanest politicians in #Pakistan – his death is a huge loss. Security failure has become an accepted norm. There will be no accountability-so continue with positive reporting as ordered by DGISPR.”

His name has confused me about another journalist and broadcasting giant of BBC Urdu – the old Raza Ali Abidi who was born in 1936 in undivided India. He had moved to Karachi with his family in 1950. He is best known for his radio documentaries and the finest among his works was ‘Grand Trunk Road’ or ‘Jernaili Sadak’ also known as ‘Sher Shah Suri Road.’ It was a bus travel travelogue from Peshawar to Calcutta.

Though we have our own share of violence when we remember the brutal murder of Mahatma Gandhi by fanatic ideologue Nathuram Godsey but there is nothing compared to the string of high stake murders in Pakistan history.

The founder of Pakistan Mohammed Ali Jinnah had died on the road without any immediate medical support a year after the creation of the new nation. In 1951, the first prime minister of Pakistan Liaquat Ali Khan was assassinated in Rawalpindi’s Company Bagh while making a public speech. His assassin was immediately shot dead but the mystery is still unresolved who ordered the killing.

Another Prime Minister Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto was murdered or executed in the fake judicial process by Gen Zia ul Haque. Bhutto was born on January 5, 1928, in Larkana, Sindh of undivided India. He was president of Pakistan 1971–1973 and prime minister 1973–1977. On April 4, 1979, he was got into the rope.

Fifty years after the death of Liaquat Ali Khan, Benazir Bhutto – the daughter of Zulfiqar, wife of ex- President Asif Ali Zardari and herself ex-Prime Minister of Pakistan was assassinated in the same garden – Company Bagh.

It was only yesterday that Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan was claiming that his government would make it sure that the minorities feel safe, protected and have equal rights in ‘New Pakistan’. “We will show the Modi government how to treat minorities…Even in India, people are saying that minorities are unsafe and not being treated as equal citizens.”

I’m not sure but the very name Raza Ali Abidi sounds a name of a minority Muslim community of Pakistan.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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The Tragedy King Dilip Kumar in trouble in the twilight of his life

When it comes to Dilip Kumar, the image of a Tragedy King eclipses all the vicissitudes and faculties of his life. He is endowed with the marvellous features, superb delivery and wonderful expressions. There has been no match to Yusuf Khan in Indian Film Industry. As an actor he is the towering figure that loomed large over the middle decades of 20th century of Indian film industry. Respect, devotion, excellence and awe, all these words can’t do justice when we talk of LOVE that Dilip Saheb has earned in his life. Of course, he has shown his feet of clay and there were many instances of that. However, that doesn’t take away his importance as the Greatest Actor of silver screen.

Dilip Saheb hasn’t been in the pink of health for quite some time now. He was detected with ‘bronchial pneumonia’ and is on medication. He has stopped work long long ago but people all over the world remember him as if he was there yesterday. In most of the gatherings when the people discuss about his health, they always urge to pray for his speedy recovery. For many of us, just his presence is blessing.

He had started his career in 1944 and worked in some of the biggest commercially successful films in the period 1949-1961. He was the first actor to receive a Filmfare Best Actor Award and holds the record for most number of Filmfare Awards won for that category.

Though he has done films of other genres occasionally and balanced out with roles such as the intense Andaz (1949) with the swashbuckling Aan (1952), the dramatic Devdas (1955) with the comical Azaad (1955) and the historical romance Mughal E Azam (1960) with the social Ganga Jamuna (1961), he pre-dominantly specialized in doing love stories or tragic roles from 1944-1961. From late 1960s roles dried up for Kumar as films starring Dev Anand, Rajendra Kumar and Shammi Kapoor were more successful from 1961-1969 and also Dilip’s films from 1966 to 1976 were box office flops like Dil Diya Dard Liya, Sunghursh, Aadmi, Dastaan, Gopi, Sagina and Bairaag and after 1976 he left films for a five year break.

After Rajesh Khanna became first superstar of Indian Cinema in 1969, most of the author backed lead roles from 1969-1991, went to Rajesh Khanna.

In 1981 Dilip returned with a character role at insistence of Manoj Kumar in the blockbuster film Kranti and continued his career playing central character roles in multi-hero films such as Shakti (1982), Karma (1986), Vidhaata, Mazdoor, Mashaal, Duniya, Dharm Adhikari, Kanoon Apna Apna, Izzatdaar, Saudagar (1991), Qila. But his only films to be successful from 1981 at box office were Kranti, Vidhaata, Karma, Dharm Adhikari, Kanoon Apna Apna and Saudagar. He has retired from the Indian Film Industry in 1998.

Dilip Saheb was born as Muhammad Yusuf Khan in Qissa Khawani Bazaar in Peshawar now in Pakistan in a Hindko speaking Awan family of twelve children. His father Ghulam Sarwar was a fruit merchant and owned large orchards in Peshawar and Devlali in Maharashtra near Mumbai.

The family had relocated to Mumbai in 1930s. In the early 1940s Yusuf Khan moved to Pune and started off with his canteen business and supplying dry fruits. He was spotted by the leading actress Devika Rani who was the wife of the founder of Bombay Talkies Himanshu Rai.

She had helped Yusuf Khan’s entry into the Bollywood film industry. She also gave him the screen name of Dilip Kumar. His first film Jwar Bhata that was released in 1944.

Dilip Saheb successfully played tragic love story roles in hit films such as Nadiya Ke Paar (1948), Mela (1948), Andaz (1949), Jogan (1950), Babul (1950), Arzoo (1950), Deedar (1951), Tarana (1951), Deedar (1951), Daag (1952), Shikast (1953) which earned him the title of “Tragedy King”. Some of his most famous films in tragic roles were box office flops like Amar (1954), Devdas (1955), Dil Diya Dard Liya (1966) and Aadmi (1968). Madhumati (1958) gave him Filmfare Award for Best Actor. In 1960 he starred in the historical film Mughal-e-Azam opposite Madhubala, which is as of 2008, the third highest grossing film in Hindi film history in which he played the role of the Mughal (crown-prince) Jehangir the son of Akbar.

In 1961 he produced and starred in the hit Ganga Jamuna in which he and his real Life brother Nasir Khan played the title roles. Despite the film success he did not produce any film after this. Dilip Kumar married actress and “beauty queen” Saira Banu in 1966 when he was aged 44 and she was 22. At the time, gossip columnists predicted doom for the high-profile couple, but the marriage survived all the storms.

According to reliable reports, Dilip Kumar was engaged to be married to Madhubala. However, it was rumoured that the two broke up due to Dilip’s ego issues. Apparently, Madhubala wasn’t being allowed to shoot at a particular location and the producer of the film had asked Dilip to convince her father. He tried to do so but failed and the actress refused to disobey her father. When it came to their marriage, Madhubala asked him to apologise to her father but Dilip refused to so and the two broke up. Madhubala was reportedly madly in love with Dilip Kumar and was apparently very sad when he got married to someone else.

How tragic it is that the man who thrilled the audiences for 5 decades is compelled today to beg the Prime Minister of India for protection in the twilight of his life???

Saira Banu, his wife, said on Tuesday that she was yet to meet Prime Minister Narendra Modi to discuss the release of builder Samir Bhojwani, who had falsely claimed ownership of two plots on which Dilip Kumar’s bungalow was built. On Sunday via Dilip Kumar’s official Twitter account, Ms Banu has requested a meeting with the prime minister in the wake of Samir Bhojwani’s release.

The former actor said she was unable to meet the prime minister when he was on a one-day visit to Maharashtra on Tuesday but she plans to follow up with the matter.

“I did not meet the prime minister here as he has been busy. But I have learnt that his office has asked people here to look into the matter. I have tweeted about it.

“I will meet him in Delhi if needed. I have no idea how I will follow this up. But I will follow it up,” Ms Banu, 74, told PTI.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Iran flexes the muscles to show its capabilities

‘Enough is enough’ was the message. And Iran is now flexing its muscles in the face of USA, Israel and their Middle East’s Arab puppets UAE and Saudi Arabia’s belligerent policies against Iran.

On 22 Sep, 2018, a military parade of the Islamic Republic of Iran was attacked in Ahvaz by ISIS in which at least 25 people were killed, including 12 members of the elite unit plus civilian spectators and one young child.

Initially, the main suspects in the Iranian’s view were a combination of ISIS and the Arab separatist groups. In response to their attack Iran fired six medium-range ballistic missiles across Iraq and into Syria early last Monday at what it said was an terrorist Islamic State base, according to Iranian news agencies.

It was a clear signal to the world in general and specifically to US and Israel that it would similarly retaliate on anyone else carrying out attacks against Iran. These missiles were aimed at Islamic State group in the eastern Euphrates River valley, close to Syria’s border with Iraq which is one of the last strongholds of the Islamic State, also called ISIS and Daesh, after its Arabic acronym, and has also been the site of recent American military activity.

A spokesman for the United States military in Syria and Iraq, Col. Sean Ryan, confirmed that a missile strike had taken place. “At this time, the coalition is still assessing if any damage occurred, and no coalition forces were in danger,” he said. “The Iranian forces did not do any prior notice last night, and we are still assessing if there is any damage.”

The missile launch, at least the second time Iran has fired ballistic missiles into Syria demonstrating the Iran’s ballistic missile capabilities. The Revolutionary Guards of Iran released video of a missile being launched and said in a statement that “many takfiris and Daesh leaders who were behind the Ahvaz attack were killed and wounded by the missiles,” according to a report by the Lebanese news agency Al Manar, which is run by Hezbollah, an Iranian ally.

Takfiri is an epithet that refers to the extremist, anti-Shiite views of the Islamic State. Social media was awash with mobile phone footage from those areas, showing the missiles rise in an orange glow before heading toward their targets. The recent retaliatory action by Iran marked an extremely rare direct attack from the Islamic Republic amid its support for embattled Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The launch of surface-to-surface medium range missiles into Syria’s Deir el-Zour province comes as ISIS militants fleeing a U.S.-led coalition onslaught increasingly try to fortify their positions there. The Revolutionary Guards, the hardliner military unit of Iran  warned ISIS militants and their “regional and international supporters” that similar retaliatory attacks would target them as well if another assault in Iran occurs.

In past, the Trump administration had re-imposed sanctions after withdrawing from the 2015 international nuclear deal with Iran, which Washington saw as inadequate for curbing Tehran’s activities in neighbouring Middle East countries and denying it the means to make an atomic bomb.

However, EU bosses have threatened not to follow US sanctions and Mr Trump’s National Security Advisor John Bolton fired a warning to Brussels saying: ”We expect that Europeans will see, as businesses all over Europe are seeing, that the choice between doing business with Iran or doing business with the United States is very clear to them. European countries have refused to break off the deal, and Iran has said it will still abide by it.

Part of the agreement, under which Iran disavows a nuclear weapons program, puts some limits on new ballistic missile technology.

India has always had a cordial, cultural, religious and historical relationship with Iran that reflects the India’s National Security Advisor (NSA) Ajit Doval’s visit to Iran on 26 September to participate in a first of its kind of meeting, of regional players, focussing on the rising threat posed by terrorism, including Daesh / ISIS, to regional and global peace, security and stability.

Iran has described the attackers of Ahvaz as being “long affiliated with the Wahhabi,” an ultraconservative form of a new Islam practiced in Saudi Arabia. However, it stopped short of directly blaming the kingdom for the attack, though many in the country expressed suspicion Iran’s regional rival had a hand in the attack.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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Peace on Earth

And in despair I bowed my head;
“There is no peace on earth,” I said;

“For hate is strong,
And mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!”

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
“God is not dead, nor doth He sleep;

The Wrong shall fail,
The Right prevail,
With peace on earth, good-will to men.”

…………………..H W Longfellow

Gimmicks can’t untie the complex knots. Very serious thinking, homework and often sacrifices are to be made to solve the complications created by history, geography, demography, false egos and vanity. Navjot Singh Sidhu has tried to enter into a territory where angels fear to tread.

However, for him, there is no way to retreat. He has made a silly mistake of embracing Bajwa. I still believe it was an innocent mistake of judgement that has harmed to no one and would harm to no one.

My feelings have been echoed in the article in ‘Hindustan Times’ by the well-known sport journalist Ayaz Memon.

He says: “Brouhaha over former cricketer and current politician Navjot Singh Sidhu hugging Pakistan’s army chief at Imran Khan’s swearing in ceremony as Prime Minister is not just manufactured and funny but senseless. The rancorous coverage that has followed shows immense silliness in section of media (and even more on social media) about foreign affairs and human interaction.”…..End of the quote.

Nobody is talking about the fine sensibility the Government of India has shown in directing its High Commissioner in Islamabad to present Imran a bat signed by the current Indian cricket players. There is so much between optics and politics of this gesture.

It should be taken with more sincerity and realism on both sides of the border. It is in the background of what Imran had said about “Taking two steps if India takes one.”

As the famous Eric Margolis, the American journalist has once described:

“A full century after World War I we still cannot understand how generals sent so many soldiers to be slaughtered. Ten million soldiers died on all sides; millions more were left maimed or shell shocked. Seven million civilians died. 20 million horses died.

The image we have of hapless soldiers being forced to climb out of their sodden trenches and attack across a hellish no-man’s land pock-marked by water-filled shell holes, deep mud, thickets of barbed wire and rotten bodies is quite accurate for the Western Front. Waiting for them were quick-firing guns, heavy artillery, the greatest killer or all – machine guns – and, later, poison or burning gases, and flamethrowers.

Ironically, though this big war was covered by very experienced war correspondents and military attachés from many nations, the dire message of the war was ignored by Western military establishments.”

In August 2006, Dr Manmohan Singh had said that peace talks between India and Pakistan can’t proceed unless the latter shows its commitment to dismantle terrorist camps on its soil.

On a question whether he would meet Pakistan president Perverz Musharraf at coming Havana summit, the ex-PM had said, “We can choose our friends but not our neighbours. ‘Batchit karne ke liye kisiko koi itraj nahin hona chaiye.’ (There should be no problem in talking with someone). But if Pakistan does not take effective steps to ‘control’ terrorist activities, peace process cannot simply progress”.

There is no such thing as bad peace and good war. Peace begins with a smile, so said Mother Teresa. This may seem overly sentimental but it is actually a pragmatic and powerful piece of advice.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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The memories of the month of August

BASIC, COBOL, FORTAN and WORDSTAR were the languages that were common before computers became the part of everyday’s life. While studying some computer’s beginner’s course at HTT College, Oxford Street, London, I’d an opportunity to befriend a bright colleague from Portugal – Manuela Coelho.

Most of our class-fellows leave good memories and she was no exception. However, she knew more about Indian history and Goa, about Vasco da Gama and Salazar, about Gandhi and Nehru. These were enough common topics that kept us often busy when she didn’t complain about the rents and bad manners of paying guest facility she was staying at Stamford Brook.

For years, after leaving England, we had been corresponding with each other. She was frank and honest even on paper about her setbacks and achievements; her breaks and new turns of life and the ups and downs of life. A decade passed and we lost touch and I don’t know what is happening to her life while I’m showing all the symptoms of slow down.

However, she taught me a Portuguese word Saudade that has no direct translation to English. May be in Urdu it would be near to Izmahal. It describes a deep nostalgia or profound melancholic longing for something or someone absent that one loves.

It also often carries a repressed knowledge that the object of longing might never return. It can be felt towards people and things whose whereabouts are unknown, or who has gone away or died. Saudade is “the love that remains” after someone is gone.

It is the recollection of feelings, experiences, places or events that once brought excitement, pleasure, well-being, which now trigger the senses and make one live again. It can be described as an emptiness, like someone that should be there in a particular moment is missing, and the individual feels this absence. It brings sad and happy feelings all together, sadness for missing and happiness for having experienced the feeling.

Come August and I begin to feel ‘Saudade’ as it was the month my mother had died in 1999 on 14th August; it was the month when my wonderful son Imroz Adeeb was born; my loving daughter Abida Naheed, the journalist, Script writer, documentary film director of Famous “A Road to Nowhere” had brought cheers for us with her birth. Fortunately or unfortunately, it is also the month when I’d vouchsafed the planet earth.

Yesterday, a new excitement, a sad event has been added to the joys of Independence Day – the death of Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee. I used to read his speeches in newspapers as a child. Radio was the only means of electronic communications in those days.

It was only in mid 1970’s when I’d personally seen Vajpayee Ji in Bombay. He had come as a known leader of opposition then, to address a gathering at Mastani Talav (popularly known as Mastan Talab also) that was a Muslim populated area near Byculla. One of my AMU friend, Abdul Rab, from Saadullah Nagar Gonda, who was my resident colleague at Ziauddin Hostel, was teaching at SabuSiddique College suggested that we participate in the gathering.

We went together that evening and Vajpayee ji didn’t disappoint us, He was at his oratorical best with his chaste and polished Urdu. After his speech, he was surrounded by the crowd of admirers. What I heard of him and I can still vividly recall is as follows:

“Are mohatram, hum ne to kitini bar in Congress walon se kaha ke Shah Zafar aour unki begum ki qabron ko poori taran ehtram se takniki etabar se mumkin ho wapas Hindustan laya jaye. Magar yeh log sunne ko tayyar naheen………Pata naheen kab badshah ka koo-e-yar men do gaz zameeen na milne ka shikwah sukoon paye ga….”

Sir, how many times we’ve asked these Congressmen to bring back the graves of Shah Zafar and wife back to Hindustan. However, these people are not willing to listen…….No one knows when the emperor’s sorrow of two yards of earth in his friend’s habitat would me assuaged. …

I had fallen in love of Vajpayee Ji that moment. I know he was a smart and cunning politician and master of political gymnastics and his was not far behind his myopic colleagues of extreme right who had razed the Babri Masjid. He played his cards well. However, the first impression that Vajpayee Ji had created dominated over all his tricky errands.

He went the same day but 19 years after my mother died. I was in Hyderabad when I got the call of my younger brother that Mom had met a severe heart attack. I returned to Delhi by the earliest flight. We got her admitted in the hospital of well-known Muslim Heart Specialist and those few days were the most painful, according to her, of her life.

I used to sleep in the gallery of the hospital at night as it was ill equipped for the care she or patients like her needed. She was assigned a boy-nurse and that was the first time that she cried in her life. There was no female nurse near her. Early in the morning when she was taken for the natural call, she refused to go with the male-nurse. After coming back from toilet she refused to allow all the pins and needles and told me to take her back home – no hospitalization any more.

Somehow, the whole family persuaded to go to another hospital – Metro Heart, Noida. She was relieved and felt happy over there. We saw the serenity and satisfaction on her face. We thought and so the doctors that she would recover. After many days we all took our lunch in peace.

By the evening her condition took the turn for the worse. By 10.30 pm doctors called us that pray for her. They suggested to put her on ventilator if we so desire. As her obedient children we asked the doctors to do what they felt good. They put her on ventilator and after half an hour they announced the end of her journey.

By 11 pm she was gone, for ever. She died in peace and honour with all her children grieving at the hospital. By 1 am, as it was now 15th August, they handed over the body. She was, for us, everything in life – a pillar of our existence. Thank God, she was not a politician and there was no confusion in her death.

Let me share the sincerity of the heart specialist who had first admitted my mother at Rohini: He had apologised every time we met in any social gathering about the negligence that my mother had met at his place. He had also sent verbal messages of regret also through common friends.

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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The sweeet-bitter memories of the month of August

BASIC, COBOL, FORTAN and WORDSTAR were the languages that were common before computers became the part of everyday’s life. While studying some computer’s beginner’s course at HTT College, Oxford Street, London, I’d an opportunity to befriend a bright colleague from Portugal – Manuela Coelho. Most of our class-fellows leave good memories and she was no exception. However, she knew more about Indian history and Goa, about Vasco da Gama and Salazar, about Gandhi and Nehru.

These were enough common topics that kept us often busy when she didn’t complain about the rents and bad manners of paying guest facility she was staying at Stamford Brook.

For years, after leaving England, we had been corresponding with each other. She was frank and honest even on paper about her setbacks and achievements; her breaks and new turns of life and the ups and downs of life. A decade passed and we lost touch and I don’t know what is happening to her life while I’m showing all the symptoms of slow down.

However, she taught me a Portuguese word Saudade that has no direct translation to English. May be in Urdu it would be near to Izmahal. It describes a deep nostalgia or profound melancholic longing for something or someone absent that one loves. It also often carries a repressed knowledge that the object of longing might never return.

It can be felt towards people and things whose whereabouts are unknown, or who has gone away or died. Saudade is “the love that remains” after someone is gone. It is the recollection of feelings, experiences, places or events that once brought excitement, pleasure, well-being, which now trigger the senses and make one live again.

It can be described as an emptiness, like someone that should be there in a particular moment is missing, and the individual feels this absence. It brings sad and happy feelings all together, sadness for missing and happiness for having experienced the feeling.

Come August and I begin to feel ‘Saudade’ as it was the month my mother had died in 1999 on 14th August; it was the month when my wonderful son Imroz Adeeb was born; my lovely daughter Abida Nahid, the journalist, film documentary maker, script writer and national award winner for her film “A Road to Nowhere” had brought cheers to family with her birth. Fortunately or unfortunately, it is also the month when I’d vouchsafed the planet earth.

Yesterday, a new excitement, a sad event has been added to the joys of Independence Day – the death of Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee. I used to read his speeches in newspapers as a child. Radio was the only means of electronic communications in those days. It was only in mid 1970’s when I’d personally seen Vajpayee Ji in Bombay. He had come as a known leader of opposition then, to address a gathering at Mastani Talav (popularly known as Mastan Talab also) that was a Muslim populated area near Byculla.

One of my AMU friend, Abdul Rab, from Saadullah Nagar Gonda, who was my resident colleague at Ziauddin Hostel, was teaching at SabuSiddique College suggested that we participate in the gathering. We went together that evening and Vajpayee ji didn’t disappoint us, He was at his oratorical best with his chaste and polished Urdu. After his speech, he was surrounded by the crowd of admirers. What I heard of him and I can still vividly recall is as follows:

“Are mohatram, hum ne to kitini bar in Congress walon se kaha ke Shah Zafar aour unki begum ki qabron ko poori taran ehtram se takniki etabar se mumkin ho wapas Hindustan laya jaye. Magar yeh log sunne ko tayyar naheen………Pata naheen kab badshah ka koo-e-yar men do gaz zameeen na milne ka shikwah sukoon paye ga….”

Sir, how many times we’ve asked these Congressmen to bring back the graves of Shah Zafar and wife back to Hindustan. However, these people are not willing to listen…….No one knows when the emperor’s sorrow of two yards of earth in his friend’s habitat would be assuaged. …

I had fallen in love of Vajpayee Ji that moment. I know he was a smart and cunning politician and master of political gymnastics and he was not also far behind his myopic colleagues of extreme right who had razed the Babri Masjid. He played his cards well. However, the first impression that Vajpayee Ji had created dominated over all his tricky errands.

He went the same day but 19 years after my mother died. I was in Hyderabad when I got the call of my younger brother that Mom had met a severe heart attack. I returned to Delhi by the earliest flight. We got her admitted into the hospital of well-known Muslim Heart Specialist and those few days were the most painful, according to her, of her life. I used to sleep in the gallery of the hospital at night as it was ill equipped for the care she or patients like her needed.

She was assigned a male-nurse and that was the first time that she cried in her life. There was no female nurse near her. Early in the morning when she was taken for the natural call, she refused to go with the male-nurse. After coming back from toilet she refused to allow all the pins and needles to be reinserted and told us to take her back home – no hospitalization any more.

Somehow, the whole family persuaded her to go to another hospital – Metro Heart, Noida. She was relieved and felt happy over there. We saw the serenity and satisfaction on her face. We thought and so the doctors that she would recover. After many days we all took our lunch in peace.

By the evening her condition took the turn for the worse. By 10.30 pm doctors called us that pray for her. They suggested to put her on ventilator if we so desire. As her obedient children we asked the doctors to do what they felt good. They put her on ventilator and after half an hour they announced the end of her journey.

By 11 pm she was gone, for ever. She died in peace and honour with all her children grieving at the hospital. By 1 am, as it was now 15th August, they handed over the body. She was, for us, everything in life – a pillar of our existence. Thank God, she was not a politician and there was no confusion in her death.

Let me share the sincerity of the heart specialist who had first admitted my mother at Rohini: He had apologised every time we met at any social gathering about the negligence that my mother had met at his place. He had also sent verbal messages of regret through common friends.  

Naim Naqvi

Did his graduation in Science discipline from AMU in 1972-73. He was Secretary of University Ali Society in 1970 and M.M. Hall Literary Society in early 70 's and member of Tayyabji Literary Society. Did his Diploma in Bakery Administration from HTT College Oxford Street London in 1987. Worked with National Herald - Delhi, Blitz - Bombay as Trainee Journalist and in Production Department with 'Naya Sansar Pictures' of Khwaja Ahmed Abbas at Bombay in early 70's. Traveled for study and training purposes to Germany, U.K., Switzerland, France, Dubai, Oman, AbuDhabi, Bahrain and Philepines.

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